Saying Yes: Joi Ito’s 9 Principles

Recently, Dan gave a TEDx talk based on the blog post 5 Principles of Extraordinary Math Teaching. In the conversations we had with each other and with other educators in the run up to the talk, one principle came up repeatedly as the most nuanced of the five: Say Yes to Your Students’ Ideas. Perhaps the most challenging principle to …

3

Goodbye hexagon, hello 6-gon!

A colleague of mine once remarked how strange it is that while the Greeks talked about 6-cornered shapes and 4-sided shapes, we talk about hexagons and quadrilaterals. Why is it, aside from the historical accident that it is, that we persist in making people learn Greek to talk about shapes they see everyday? And quadrilaterals and hexagons are the easy …

1

The Four Questions

We’ve argued for a long time that the real experience of mathematics is inextricably tied to play. But if you’re a parent or teacher, you’ve seen kids play in mathematically irrelevant ways. How do we hit that sweet spot of mathematical play? One way is to recognize mathematical questions and ideas when they arise from the play itself. Another is …

15

5 principles of extraordinary math teaching

We’re just finishing up a massive project of creating a supplementary curriculum for Seattle’s Summer School program. We realized that the spirit of the lessons was even more important than the content. To this end, we designed the activities to encourage students to own their mathematical experiences, to give kids an opportunity—and a reason—to fall in love with math. So …

Play is where love begins

I recently wrote a piece for the New York Times Numberplay blog on what we do to help people fall in love with math. I thought I’d include it here. __________________________ No matter whom we work with, our initial goal is for them to have an authentic, mathematical experience; that is the first step to helping anyone — teachers, students, …

1

Revisiting Internal Motivation

There is a tension between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation in teaching mathematics. Our answer to the classic student questions Why do I need to learn this? is a good measure of where we look for motivation. You can appeal to the extrinsic, or instrumental, rewards: you need math to succeed in get a good grade, to succeed in middle school, …

1

Who is the most famous?

One fun thing math lets us do is measure difficult-to-measure things. Like fame. We all have an instinct for what fame is, and the more we put it into words, the more we’ll find we can translate fully into math. So what let’s us know if someone is famous? Well, famous people are well known. We tend to know them, …

The Mathematically Inclined Shall Inherit the Earth

“… at this point, it’s in the hands of people who are mathematically inclined.” —Stephen Hsu The January 6th New Yorker contains an article on B.G.I., a Chinese company seeking to do major work in the field of genetics. According to them, the massive amounts of genetic data they (and others) are collecting and interpolating will help “explain the origins …

Twin Prime Hero

I just read this wonderful interview with Tom Zhang, who made recent, important progress on the Twin Prime conjecture. It’s a strange, quiet interview, and a lovely departure from the world of the fame-obsessed. Another thing I like: he emphasizes the love and the persistence. Here’s how the interview ends: What would you say to a young student who wants …

3

A spoonful of transgression

I was just observing a third grade class learning/reviewing basic fraction to decimal conversion, and I overheard a great remark. A girl, reading a word problem, said to her table mate, “Jessica ate 6/10 of a cake?! She’s fat.” There’s a part of me that hates comments like that, and a part that loves them. I hate the comment because, …