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Math that makes worlds

From the May 18 New Yorker article World Without End, by Raffi Khatchadourian: The design allows for extraordinary economy in computer processing: the terrain for eighteen quintillion unique planets flows out of only fourteen hundred lines of code. Because all the necessary visual information in the game is described by formulas, nothing needs to be rendered graphically until a player …

2

Counting Collections and Dots and Boxes, fractional version

I just rewrote our write up of Counting Collections, and reclassified it on our Lessons page as a Foundational Activity. The reclassification was motivated in part by a conversation with a Kindergarten teacher, who mentioned that she had been having the kids in her room count collections every Friday. “I help kids who need it,” she said, “but honestly, they’re …

3

Primo – the beautiful, colorful, mathematical board game

Primo A Totally Unique Mathematical Board Game from Math for Love More than a year ago we had an idea to build a game around what felt like one of the unsung ideas in math: prime numbers make multiplication easy. (Why does no one learn this in school?) We realized that with the right color-coding, it would be possible to …

3

Horseshoes (and Hand Grenades)

We’ve recently invented a game that surely already exists in some form already. But it’s been super fun to play, and we’ve been using it with kids and teachers at all grades. It’s kind of magic. We don’t have a scoring system for the game, and I don’t think it needs it in many cases, but if you have ideas …

8

“Help, my daughter hates math!”

Back in August, an email with the subject “Help, my daughter hates math!” showed up in the Math for Love inbox. To quote that email: Here’s our situation:  We are entering our fourth year of home schooling and my 10 y/o daughter has been utterly unable to memorize basic math facts.  She does seem to grasp new concepts quickly (though …

2

Math Consulting: Games to Content, by way of Questions

We’ve been loving running math workshops for teachers. First of all, teachers are awesome: they’re some of the hardest working, most motivated people out there. They want to know as much math as they can, and they want to help their students learn it. So it’s a pleasure for us, as two mathematicians, to come in and discuss what’s possible …

6

Hex Board!

If you read about the amazing gift of the (now consumed) Sierpinskitaschen last week, you would rightly assume that our present karma had about played itself out. Not so! On Tuesday I had two students–third graders at an after school math circle I lead–present me with one of the all time awesome-est gifts I have ever received. I am, you …

4

My Short List: Books and Games for Parents and Young Kids

A parent recently asked me a great question: what books (and games) would be useful for home use? There are lots of resources around, such as living math, or the book list from Love 2 Learn 2 Day, where you can find great ideas for math books and games to read and play at home. However, sometimes the sheer profusion …

10

Triangle: A new math card game

A 10-year-old I meet with greeted me yesterday by telling me that he’d had an idea for a game called “Triangle” right before going to bed. He described the basic premise, and we toyed with different ideas for game play. As we worked, I mentioned my three guidelines for inventing a game: It should have a clear goal. It should …

5

Post Salon Contentment

Back from the math salon and feeling great. I’ve been able to make some minor adjustments since the last one: I added a challenge problem, a group game after people have mostly arrived to break the ice, a little discussion of the relation of games to questions and math, and more written down to help people jump right into playing …