Prime Climb Color Chart

Our first board game, Prime Climb, is a mathematical powerhouse. You can get the game on Amazon, or check other options. The good news is, there’s plenty of ways to use the factorized color-coding of the game. Show the Prime Climb chart up to 20. Ask students what they notice, and any conjectures for how the coloring works. Optional: Extend …

Broken Calculator Warm Up

Broken Calculators are one of the most versatile and delightful openers I know. The image itself communicates the heart of the puzzle, while leaving students open to all manner of different and personal approaches to reaching the goal. Read the lesson below, and check out the images underneath. It’s easy to make your own! This is a good early Broken …


2, 4, 6 Puzzle

The 2-4-6 Puzzle teaches an invaluable lesson about inductive reasoning, confirmation bias, and how “wrong” answers lead to deeper knowledge. It can be adapted with different rules for endless play options and difficulties. Also see Josh Golden’s writeup of Eleusis Express for a card game version of the game, perfect to play with standard cards, SET cards, or Tiny Polka …

Subtracting Reverses

This extraordinary lesson combines base ten subtraction practice with an irresistible mystery. A pattern slowly reveals itself as the class compiles data.


Pattern Block Triangles

This beautiful lesson combines student creative work, counting and addition practice, combining geometric shapes, and a slow build from easier to more challenging work.

Fill the Stairs

Fill the Stairs requires the thoughtful placement of two-digit numbers in order from least to greatest, before all the numbers are known. Overall, it is a fun and compelling game that holds up after repeated playing.

Penny, Nickel, Dime

This version of Don’t Break the Bank is a hit with students, and also helps give a concrete meaning to place value by linking it to both money, addition, estimation, and multiplying by fives and tens. It takes very little time, so it can be used as a warmup, station activity, or in those five minutes before class ends. While …


Story Problem – The Monster

For this long-form story problem, read the story to your class first, then give them the questions to answer, and the story as a reference. Optional artistic tie-in: draw a picture of the monster. Optional challenge: write another question about the story.