2

Primo – the beautiful, colorful, mathematical board game

Primo

A Totally Unique Mathematical Board Game from Math for Love

More than a year ago we had an idea to build a game around what felt like one of the unsung ideas in math: prime numbers make multiplication easy. (Why does no one learn this in school?) We realized that with the right color-coding, it would be possible to see multiplication and division as combining or removing colors.

Primo BoardA year later, Primo is ready. The game plays beautifully in play test after play test. It’s one of the most mathematically rich games we have ever seen, and at the same time avoids that icky “educational game” feel. Primo is a real game and it’s worth playing because it’s fun. Really fun.

The game is a race. Arithmetic is the engine, but not the end. Players add, subtract, multiply, and divide their way to the center of the board, knocking each other back to start and collecting Primo cards as they land on primes (the red circles) along the way. It’s a very easy game to learn, and infinitely replayable. Kids (and adults) practice their arithmetic without even noticing that they’re learning, and the game makes prime numbers intuitive and multiplication legible.

We decided to launch Primo via Kickstarter, and the campaign is up and running right now. This means that you can get a first run copy of Primo by donating to our campaign right now.

But if you really want to help us get Primo into the world, tell people about it. The beauty and terror of Kickstarter is that if we don’t make our goal, we don’t get to print up the first run of 1000 copies, and Primo gets relegated to some dusty closet. Email your friends and colleagues, post on Facebook, tweet, and let others know that they can get the game here:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/343941773/primo-the-beautiful-colorful-mathematical-board-ga

We hope you love this game. Thanks for your support.

Dan & Katherine
Math for Love

 

 

 

Comments 2

  1. Pingback: Primo: now a colourful, actual mathematical board game | The Aperiodical

  2. Pingback: How to Play Like a Mathematician | Maxwell's Demon

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *